Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Project: Wentworth House
Architects: MHN Design Union
Location: Sydney, Australia
Photographs by: Richard Glover

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Wentworth House by MHN Design Union

MHN Design Union is an Australian studio based in Sydney and who have gained some recognition for one of their projects called the Wentworth House. It is located in Vaucluse, a suburb of Sydney, Australia whose design brief was to provide a large home that will blend into its surroundings.

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

The site is located on the southern ridges of Sydney Harbour at the crest of a gully which feeds into Vaucluse Bay. It is heavily wooded with mature eucalypt and palm trees dotted around the site. The site is characterised by a series of sandstone rock shelfs which occur at various heights as you descend down from the street level.

The design brief was to provide a family home which provided generous amenity yet sat quietly within the landscape. Our intent was to capture the story of the site through the design of the house. From the outset we wanted to merge the house and land in a seamless way. Our response was to create a series of planar elements in both plan and section to define the spaces which interlock and extend into the landscape. Overlaying this idea is the linking stair which threads through the levels twisting and turning like a piece of rope. The blade walls are parallel and orientate to the north east with the ends open or glazed thus providing transparency and openness to light, ventilation and harbour views.

In section, the multiple floor levels are treated like cascading platforms and echo the existing rock shelf. These platforms serve to lower you through the house similar to an initial discovery of the site. The stair is central to this experience with the primary spaces extending from it like eddies from a stream. These spaces are quiet and reposed yet maintain their visual connection to the circulation spine. The swimming pool extends the living space and sits high above the ground almost touching the tree canopy.

Emphasising the experiential sequence is a sense of materiality and texture with off form concrete, recycled Ironbark, Burnt Ash and Basaltina stone forming the primary palette. The sense of touch is heightened with the warmth of the native timbers complementing the smooth finishes of the concrete walls and stone floors.

MHN Design Union

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

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Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

Wentworth House by MHN Design Union in Sydney, Australia

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20 Remarkable Modern Home Exterior Designs That Will Steal Your Gaze

The exterior design of your home is one of the most important aspects of the way your home creates its perception. It can make people be like “Wow!” when they pass along the street or it can make them completely ignore it. We know that when it comes to the modern home exterior design, it is easy to create that surprise factor that makes it so noticeable by everyone. Besides, do you not want to spend a moment enjoying the beautiful exterior design of your modern home everytime you go out or go back in?

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Welcome to a new collection of home designs in which we’ve featured 20 Remarkable Modern Home Exterior Designs That Will Steal Your Gaze. Take a moment to explore the awesome modern home exterior designs that we thought you are going to like. Spoiler alert! You will like them.
This collection is also the last one of this batch of modern home designs that we’ve been featuring as part of our showcase of the modern style. If you want to catch up with it, make sure to check out the all of the pieces of the showcase, featuring the kitchenbathroombedroomliving roomdining roomhome officekids’ roomhome barstaircase,  hallwaysunroom, and entry hall. That’s it as far as the interiors are concerned, but we’ve also featured designs of the outdoor areas such as the modern entranceporchdeckpatiolandscapebalcony, and swimming pool. Enjoy!

1. Birches Bay

2. Ashburton House

3. Modern Exterior

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4. Modern Home Exterior

5. O.M.T. house

6. Modern Exterior

7. Mason Residence

8. Waters Edge Home

9. Modern Home Exterior

10. House M in Leipzig

11. Corner Pocket House – Manhattan Beach, CA

12. Lake Minnetonka Retreat Home

13. Modern Home Exterior

14. Wayzata Residence

15. Hibiscus Residence

16. Lakeview 1

17. The Tropical House

18. Coastal home – St Andrews

19. Modern Home Exterior

20. House Jun

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20 Spectacular Asian Home Exterior Designs You’ll Adore

The exterior design of your home is the first thing that gets to anyone regardless if they are visiting you or simply passing along the street. It is also very important in creating your own perception of your home. If it looks good and pleasing to you then you will feel happier about it and enjoy your stay even more.
We’ve already shown you plenty of Asian designs including both interior and designs of outdoor areas so it is fitting that we now conclude the showcase of this style with the Asian home exterior design.

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Welcome to a new collection of home designs in which we’ve featured 20 Spectacular Asian Home Exterior Designs You’ll AdoreCheck out the designs that we’ve featured in this new collection and feel free to explore the rest of the collections from the Asian style showcase. It consists of designs of interiors such as the kitchenbathroombedroom,  living roomdining roomhome officekids’ roomhome barstaircasehallway and entrance as well as designs from the outdoor areas, including the decklandscapebalconypatio and swimming pool. Use this opportunity to gain an insight on the overall design of the homes that originate from China, Japan, India and the other oriental nations. Enjoy!

1. Asian Home Exterior in Japan

2. The Kuro – display home

3. Sycamore Trace

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4. Kerala Traditional Style House Bangalore

5. Japanese Home exterior

6. Single story Japan home

7. Traditional Asian Exterior

8. Narrow Japanese House

9. Modern Asian Home

10. Contemporary Japanese Home in Nagoya

11. Modern Exterior

12. Natural Light

13. Single Story in Japan

14. Unique Wooden Exterior

15. Modern Compact Asian Home Exterior

16. Exterior and Landscape

17. Gabled Roof

18. Minimal Features

19. Wooden Cladding

20. Modern Asian Exterior

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17 Tremendous Industrial Home Exterior Designs You’ve Never Seen Before

Unique as it gets, the industrial home exterior design is certainly eye-catching. But its eccentricity doesn’t make it any less elegant or beautiful than the home exteriors designed in other styles such as the modern, contemporary, rustic or Mediterranean. In fact, this beautiful eccentricity is what makes the industrial style so desirable. In this collection, we want to showcase you the many different forms an industrial home can take. It has a very wide range of materials, shapes and finishes that make a unique and modern piece of home design when combined carefully.

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Welcome to a new collection of home designs in which we want to show you 17 Tremendous Industrial Home Exterior Designs You’ve Never Seen Before. Check them out below and remember that we’ve featured almost all parts of the industrial home in our recent showcase. You can find inspiration in the form of industrial deckslandscapespatios and swimming pools as far as outdoor areas go. We’ve also featured the interiors such as the industrial kitchenbedroombathroomliving roomdining roomhome officekids’ roomstaircase and hallway. Enjoy!

1. Industrial Home Exterior

2. Monitor Street, Brooklyn

3. Palo Verde in Arizona

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4. Picard Lane

5. Industrial Home Exterior

6. 1005 Brass

7. Old Brewery Residence

8. Zinc House

9. Sunnyland Residence

10. Love Shack

11. Lucky John Residence

12. Casa Fck in Barcelona

13. Rain Shelter House

14. Little B

15. Hunter Valley Farmhouse

16. Delz Warehouse

17. Industrial Exterior

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17 Glorious Mediterranean Exterior Designs That Will Take Your Breath Away

The Mediterranean exterior design is truly a spectacular sight. It takes the idea of a house and infuses it with palatial features unlike any we’ve seen present in other home design styles. Everything about this style revolves around elegance and luxury. The landscaped gardens and pathways that lead to the entrance or the beautiful backyard that complements the exterior design of the home. There’s simply no flaw. But we’ll let you decide on that after you take a look at the following images.

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Welcome to a brand new collection of home designs in which we’ve featured 17 Glorious Mediterranean Exterior Designs That Will Take Your Breath Away. Check them out below, but be prepared to have your breath taken away by these spectacular Mediterranean exterior designs.
This collection is the last one of our recent showcase of the Mediterranean home. In it, we’ve covered the interiors, including the kitchenbathroombedroomliving roomdining roomsunroomkids’ room, home officewine cellarhallwaystaircase and entryhall. Besides the interiors, we’ve featured plenty of outdoor designs such as the decklandscapeporchpatiobalcony and swimming pool. Enjoy!

1. Lakeside Villa

2. Woods Hole Residence

3. Corona Del Mar Custom Home

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4. Mediterranean Exterior

5. 105 Larkhaven

6. Riatta Oaks Ranch

7. House in Forest Hills, Tennessee

8. Mediterranian Estate in Coral Gables

9. Formal Mediterranean

10. Greatwater Retreat

11. Spanish Wells

12. Pasadena Mansion

13. Prato Estate

14. Century Woods 1

15. Il Nostro Sogno

16. Tuscan Mediterranean

17. Spanish Delight

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Villa B by Tectoniques Architects in Lyon, France

Project: Villa B
Architects: Tectoniques Architects
Location: Lyon, France
Area: 2,195 sq ft
Photographs by: Erick Saillet

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Villa B by Tectoniques Architects

Located in Lyon, France, Villa B is best described as a slatted wood home that is not only visually stunning but it also appeals with a green sense too.
It was designed by Tectoniques Architects as a bioclimatic home that makes use of a solar passive design combined with a highly efficient envelope that minimizes the loss of valuable energy. It is oriented for maximum solar exposure, although it is protected by a system of Larch wood slats so that it doesn’t overheat. The slat exterior encourages natural ventilation while it also serves as a rainscreen.

The house itself spans across two levels. On the ground floor, it shelters an office, a living room as well as a dining room and a kitchen that wrap around a central utility space. The second floor boasts four bedrooms.

Villa B by Tectoniques Architects in Lyon, France

The plan is efficient, almost square, measuring 10 x 11m. Along the west of the ground floor is a garage finished in black pannels timber composite, extended by a canopy. Free and open, it is organised around a central core that contains the services: cellar, networks, shower/bath room, and kitchen. All the rooms form a ring around this hub. Uninterrupted through views and continual contact with nature are maintained by using sliding partitions and large glazed areas facing each other. A strip of ancillary and storage areas runs along the full height of the west wall.
The overall scheme creates a multipurpose space, open onto the south and north gardens and the patios. Consistency is created between the building and the external spaces, which enhance each other. Thus the living area becomes larger than the space delimited by the walls.

The house faces due south. Largely glazed, it benefits from solar gain, while being protected by brise-soleil adjustable louver sun breaks to control stronger sunshine in the summer, spring and autumn. Open onto the south and east, its upper floor is closed on the north, and the west side only has small openings for the showers and bathrooms. Since the local climate is strongly contrasted, with peaks of heat and cold, this plan layout allows maximum occupation of the patios according to the seasons, sheltered from the wind. In the long term, a variety of intermediate and peripheral elements may enhance the existing and vary the spaces, according to the weather and the seasons, such as arbours, canopies, pergolas, etc. On the upper floor, the system is reversed: the layout organisation starts from the core and opens onto the bedrooms.
Following the principle of separation of daytime and night-time areas, the upper floor is occupied by four bedrooms and two bathrooms. The bedrooms face south and east, while the bathrooms open to the west. In addition to the clearly-identified living areas, the house has intermediate and multipurpose spaces. This is the case on the ground floor, which, with its sliding partitions, can have several layouts; also, some rooms that are not set aside for any specific purpose can be reconfigured according to the time of day, e.g., study-laundry-computer room or guest bedroom-study-music room. This adaptability is a response to the need to manage both privacy and communal life within the family home.

The construction is simple. It is a timber-framed house, erected on a concrete slab, with a concrete topping laid on the upper floor. The structure is a prefabricated modular system. The roof insulation consists of 40 cm thick expanded cellulose wadding, and the wall insulation consists of mineral wool with woodwool on the outside, giving a total thickness of 32 cm. The woodwool slows down warming and cooling of the house by a lagging effect.

On the ground floor, three large triple-glazed panels – with a fixed part and a translating (tilting) opener – run along the elevation at ceiling height and frame the landscape. They avoid interrupting the views by door and window frames, and they draw the eyes towards the outside. On the upper floor, in the bedrooms, low tilt-and-turn windows have a fixed window-breast at bed height.

On the facades, perforated larch cladding is fixed to double 5 x 5 cm wall plates to further increase the ventilation effect. The cladding gradually greys naturally, without any treatment, with uniform silvery tinges. Inside, a lining of knot-free, light-coloured polar panels is used with great uniformity for built-in cupboards, furniture and storage elements. Elsewhere, white plasterboard adds to the soft, brightly-lit atmosphere of the house.

Space heating is mainly provided by floor heating on the ground floor and the upper floor. It is supplied by a condensation gas boiler and solar panels. The double-flow ventilation system is connected to a glycolated ground-air heat exchanger laid at a depth of between 2.00 and 2.50 m to the north of the house, which supplies air at a constant temperature of 12°C. When necessary, the exchanger can provide additional ventilation at night. During cold peaks, wood-burning stove covers additional heating needs, calculated for the overall volume and instantaneously, particularly for the upper floor. Waxed concrete and floor heating provide very pleasant thermal comfort.
The concrete topping, which is chosen despite the timber structure, provides uniformity of floors on the ground floor and upper floor, in bedrooms, showers and bath rooms. In addition, the roof is planted with a sedum [stonecrap] covering, and rainwater is collected in an underground tank. All of these systems require some control to function as well as possible. This is a technical matter that needs a certain degree of mastery, which is acquired empirically and requires the occupants to take an interest in them and to change their habits.

Tectoniques Architects

Villa B by Tectoniques Architects in Lyon, France

Villa B by Tectoniques Architects in Lyon, France

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Villa B by Tectoniques Architects in Lyon, France

Villa B by Tectoniques Architects in Lyon, France

Villa B by Tectoniques Architects in Lyon, France

Villa B by Tectoniques Architects in Lyon, France

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How To Choose The Right Facade With Street Appeal

First impressions count! If you consider why you purchased your home you will probably remember that your first impression drew you in. You wanted a house that could be a home, which was good looking but had the potential for you to place your own mark on it.

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This initial appeal was all about the façade of the building. Get the right façade and your home will have street appeal. Get it wrong and people will cross the road!

The good news is that the façade can be changed. Whether you have purchased a home that is great on the inside and not so good on the outside or, one that looked good but now looks dated; you can improve it.

There are several steps to choosing the right façade:

1. Understand the Wall

A blank wall has a very different look to a curtain wall. You need to consider whether you can cover the entire wall in one material or if you need to leave space for a window opening or to create an effect.

The answer to this will help you decide on the right material for your façade.

How To Choose The Right Facade With Street Appeal

2. Consult

You need to be aware of the different options available to you. This can be partially done by looking at the properties in your neighborhood and reviewing what facades they have and whether they are appealing to you and will suit your home.

However, it is better to have a consultation with a reputable firm and find out about every potential façade as well as see some images of buildings with each type of finish.

How To Choose The Right Facade With Street Appeal

3. Budget

It is important to be aware of your budget and finances to ensure you purchase a façade that is affordable. This will ensure it improves the value of your home and your enjoyment; instead of adding additional stress at the thought of having to pay for it.

Many facades are not as expensive as you think they will be; it is worth taking a look!

How To Choose The Right Facade With Street Appeal

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4. Consider The Area

You need to verify whether there are any building regulations which will affect your choice of façade or the range of options available to you.

In addition you need to consider what is already in existence within your neighborhood. It is acceptable to opt for something completely different but you must be sure that it will fit with planning regulations.

Keeping the neighbors happy will help to ensure you enjoy your home every time you arrive.

How To Choose The Right Facade With Street Appeal

5. Maintenance

You must consider the time you have available and the level of maintenance which will be required to maintain your façade. It s important to keep it looking its best to help justify the investment and ensure you remain happy with it.

If you have little time you will be able to get professional help to complete the maintenance but if this is not an affordable option you need to select a façade which can be easily looked after by yourself.

Remember; the façade is the first thing which people see when they view your home. Getting it right is important so take your time making the right decision.

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Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Project: Black Lodge
Architects: Tomislav Soldo
Location: Gorski Kotar, Croatia
Area: 1,076 sq ft
Photographs by: Jure Živković

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Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo

Tomislav Soldo is a Croatian architect who has designed the Black Lodge in the mountainous region of Gorski Kotar in Croatia.
The modern two-story residence offers 1,076 square feet of living space as well as large windows that provide beautiful views of the spectacular surroundings.
The house doesn’t stand out much from the other homes in the region. It has a pitched roof, a compact layout and a facade made of wood, however, it is still unique in its own way. Check it out!

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

The genesis of this house might have a somewhat peculiar narrative. The possibly reversed but certainly not unwanted process of conceiving and designing the space where the foremost sensory role has the nature itself.

Initially, before everything else, there was a walnut tree, providing perfect natural shade and representing the first outdoor residing space. Over time, a terrace was gradually shaped around the tree, and eventually the idea of building the house emerged.

The sloped terrain with its panoramic view overlooking the nearby forest and mountainscape together with the position of the existing terrace were the only determining elements in the process of designing this country house.
Without any need for flirting with or referring to existing and traditional in its surrounding, with no need for appropriation or approval, this was simply about to be a house on a hill, a terrace extension and enclosed belvedere. The pitched roof, the compact layout design and the usage of wood in facade cladding were the only distinctive functional elements of the region accepted and implemented into the design.

With the gross floor area of 100m2 the house consists of a small storage on basement level, a living room with an open kitchen and a bathroom unit on the ground floor, and a sleeping area on mezzanine level.

The intention to obtain a spatial flow between the exterior and interior, notably in terms of connecting the indoor kitchen area, the summer outdoor kitchen and the terrace, was equally sought to be achieved in the interior design itself in the form of an open space plan.

Accordingly, the entire house is perceived as a single volume, greatly reflecting the surrounding nature from its every single point, whereas the kitchen and the bathroom area form a small compact box-like core set within the larger house volume.

Apart from the concrete basement and foundations, the house was entirely made of aerated concrete blocks which significantly accelerated construction at the given location. The 30cm thick exterior walls, also made of aerated concrete blocks, met all building physics requirements with no additional thermal insulation needed. The thermal efficiency in terms of unwanted overheating during summer and heat loss in winter time was enhanced by a ventilated facade made of Siberian larch cladding.

The facade is painted with two layers of black wood tar, a natural genuine product which penetrates deep into the wood giving it protection and lasting for a long period of time.

The appearance of daytime black compact and seemingly monolithic structure is altered in the evening by switching the lights on. The house becomes a delicate almost lantern like object, casting light on its surroundings through the shutter slots imitating the sun rays that illuminate the interior during the day.

Tomislav Soldo

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

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Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

Black Lodge by Tomislav Soldo in the Croatian Countryside

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Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Project: Palatine Passive House
Architects: Malboeuf Bowie Architecture
Location: Greenwood, Seattle, Washington, USA
Area: 2,700 sq ft
Photographs by: Shea Pollard

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Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture

Malboeuf Bowie Architecture have created a masterpiece of a house in the form of the Palatine Passive House which is located in Greenwood, Seattle.
This home uses 90% less energy than what the standard building code requires. Simultaneously, it provides its residents with a modern and incredibly comfortable living space.
It’s amazingly low energetic footprint is achieved by optimizing the lighting, cooling, heating and ventilation using a smart monitoring system that is controlled by a mobile app. But that’s not where the uniqueness of this home ends.
On the outside, it’s got a distinct herringbone facade to greet you. It is more than just a unique facade as it requires absolutely no maintenance.
The interior of the home is inspired by the Scandinavian design. Take a look!

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Conceived as a sustainable reinterpretation of a monolithic gable roof house, the Palatine Passive House integrates modern residential form with innovative building technologies. The certified passive house was designed and built by the architect. Apart from an abundantly glazed entrance gesture, the distinctive façade is windowless in order to meet passive house certification standards.

The unique façade is composed of hand-charred cedar in a herringbone pattern, adding a twist to a classic Northwest American building material. The dark patina complements the lush, tree-lined neighborhood streets, while the shou sugi ban treatment naturally seals the cedar, eliminating the need for regular maintenance in a rainy Seattle climate. Once inside, the large windows and white, minimal interior maximize natural daylight to create a light filled space that is private from the street.

The first level is a large open volume that spills out to the back yard for the social functions of the residential program. High ceilings on the second floor allow for a mix of private and loft spaces. An open double height circulation area joins the two levels and connects the public and private functions of the house.

In pursuing PHIUS certification, innovative building technologies and construction methods emerged in the envelope assembly, cladding fabrication, and energy management systems. Due to an airtight envelope, continuous high-performance insulation, and managed solar gain, the Palatine Passive House uses 90% less energy than required by local building code. The house employs a continuously filtered heat and moisture recovery ventilation system, resulting in excellent air quality and temperature control for a healthy, comfortable living environment. Kirio, a home management & control system, monitors all major energy components, optimizes efficiency, and allows residents to manage lighting, cooling, heating, and ventilation from a phone app. In a testament to the progressive design, engineers used the Palatine Passive House as testing ground for the system.

Malboeuf Bowie Architecture

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

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Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

 

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

Palatine Passive House by Malboeuf Bowie Architecture in Greenwood, Seattle

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